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ABUSE OF SOCIAL WORK STUDENTS

Social Workers
SOCIAL WORK 1
NSW LABOR - COURT 2
LIANE FLYNN 3
SPIGELMAN YEARS 4
JO GAHA 5
THE DAMAGE 6
ABUSE OF LAW 7
OUR FEARS 8
NSW GOVERNMENT 9
UPDATE 11/1/2016
PUPLICK - RICE 11
VICTIM OF CRIME 12
16 June 2016
I HAD TO DEAL WITH THIS?

this is you

how to find flynn

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so called..social worker

Jo Gaha

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Head Of Dep - DVC -

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Dean Of Students

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Deborah Plath

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alison rowlands

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Nicholas Saunders

Policy? What Policy?

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DoCS EXECUTIVE
FLYNN'S CHILDREN
FLYNN'S JUSTICE
20/20 WOMEN
DELIVERY POLICY
ENGLISH - GAHA

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roger holmes1998

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University Will Pay Back - ALWAYS

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Social Worker Dara SAMPSON

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University ALWAYS pay back

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The UNIVERSITY of NEWCASTLE

4 August, 1999


Ms Nanette Bryant,
University Counselling Service


Dear Nanette, This is to introduce Ms VS, a third year student in the Bachelor of Social Work


Ms VS has a number of issues to do with her dissatisfaction with the way in which she has experienced supervision and feedback within the Department. She wishes to review the impact made upon her and the ways in which she is reacting to her perceived treatment in the Department. I believe that she would benefit from early contact with a member of the Counselling staff. Yours sincerely,
Brian
English,
Deputy Vice-Chancellor


PHONE 02 4921 5114 FAX 02 4921 7060


INTERNATIONAL TEL: +61 2 4921 5114


INTERNATIONAL FAX: +61 2 4921 7060
Email: deputy-vc@newcastle.edu.au

THE CHANCELLERY, UNIVERSITY DRIVE,


CALLAGHAN NSW 2308 AUSTRALIA

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From: Geoff Gordon
Dear Vesna
I refer to our discussion yesterday afternoon at which I undertook to advise you regarding the letter to Louise Booth of which you provided a copy. I must advise that Louise was instructed not to respond to your letter and I think it must remain at that. However, to set your mind at rest on this issue at least, I feel I should tell you that Louise did advise me that she was not then and is not now in fear for her safety

Geoff Gordon

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02_sept_leave_of_absence_from_uni.jpg.

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08 june 11 drFerguson re employement.jpg.

ABUSE OF STUDENTS 2011
SOCIAL WORK DEPARTMENT

11 sept 30 Uni did it again.jpg.

* THANKS TO FORMER CHIEF JUDGE MR SPIGELMAN AND THE CORRUPT NSW LEGAL SYSTEM NEWCASTLE UNIVERSITY NEVER TOOK ANY RESPONSIBILITY FOR THE CRIMES AND DISCRIMINATIONS THAT WENT FOR YEARS. THAT HAS GIVEN UNIVERSITY COURAGE TO BEHAVE HOWEVER THEY WANT. SO THE CRIME KEEPS TO BE THE NORM

when crime becomes a law

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* OLD ALLEGATIONS 'ARE OUT OF TIME', NEW ALLEGATION WILL BE IGNORED UNTIL NSW LEGAL SOCIETY SUCCEED IN KEEPING CRIMES IN COURTS FOR YEARS, AUSTRALIAN MEDIA WILL BE PAID TO ASSIST AND COVER THE CRIMES, POLICE DO NOT INVESTIGATE CRIMINAL ACTS COMMITTED BY JUDGES AND LAWYERS AND THERE'S NOBODY OUT THERE TO OVERLOOK CORRUPT NSW POLICE CHIEF COMMISSIONER. SO FOR THE TIME BEING CORRUPTION IS "SAFE"

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Brian English flatly denied having done any such thing: PROF ENGLISH, DEPUTY VICE-CHANCELLOR, STATED: It's false but it's also ludicrous

On Thursday 30 June 2005 The ICAC investigated an allegation of corrupt conduct made in January 2003 by lecturer Ian Firns regarding the handling of a report by him of plagiarism by 15 post-graduate business students at Institute WIRA in Malaysia, a private educational organisation through which the University of Newcastle offered a Master of Business Administration

INTERNATIONAL UNI STUDENTS PUSHED AND ROBBED AT JESMOND

07 May, 2012

TWO international university students were pushed to the ground and robbed in the latest attack at Jesmond.
Police said the two girls, aged 17 and 18, walked past a group of youths at a bus shelter on Blue Gum Road about 6.30pm.

They were heckled and later followed by two of the youths, who came up behind them and attempted to grab their bags.

When they fought back, one of the girls was pushed to the ground.

Her screams alerted a resident before the two boys ran off down Goodwin Street.

The attack is the latest incident involving violence towards international students at the Uni of Newcastle 

NEWCASTLE UNI STUDENTS RAIL AT PLAGIARISM CLAIMS

29 September, 2011

NEWCASTLE UNI STUDENTS RAIL AT PLAGIARISM CLAIMS

29 September, 2011

newcastleunistudentsrailatplagiarismclaims.jpg

STUDENTS are expected to stage a protest at the University of Newcastle's

city campus today over their treatment after being accused of mass plagiarism and collusion. The Business and Law faculty students are upset it has taken so long to process accusations against about 45 students

Further, they said the executive had now backed away from accusations of collusion and students were instead being made to answer subsequent plagiarism allegations that arose during the investigation.

Following inquiries from the Newcastle Herald the university said yesterday it had met affected students and agreed to resolve outstanding issues by October 10. In an email to students it apologised for delays, confusion and distress caused and said collusion was not an appropriate word to have used

The situation came to a head at the weekend when the university sent police to check on the welfare of a student early on Sunday after he sent a distressed email to pro vice-chancellor (global) Professor Kevin McConkey. The same student had collapsed earlier in the week during a meeting about the allegations. Newcastle University Students Association president Heather Richards said it was because of the stress. “The situation is now urgent. Students are looking to transfer university or to return home,’’ she said. ‘‘They are trying to contact media outlets in their home countries because they believe they have been mistreated by the university" She said the cases of some students had been dropped, some told to resubmit and some told to resubmit and receive a penalty

Ms Richard said resubmitting was difficult for students who still had not been informed what they had done wrong. The association was successful in lobbying for a second person to mark resubmitted assignments, but also wants an inquiry into the situation.

A University of Newcastle spokeswoman said they had reviewed the sequence of events, and staff from their international office had been in regular contact with students.

BY ALISON BRANLEY

EDUCATION REPORTER

I'm asked if this incident left me surprised... because Australia has been very vocal and apologetic towards abuse of students. 
No I wasnt surprised, I would be surprised if it never happened again. My case is known and discussed in every part of Australia, through schools, Universities, streets and cafee bars. What was the message of my experience published for everyone to read... and be aware?  "Yes, you can do whatever you want to do, to whom ever you want, particularly defenceless international students. Alone, far from its own homes and country.. they are easy target. If real damage come out of it.. well, we have courts Our judges are willing to steal, tampered with, remove documents if necessary. You will walk free and victims will be punished for being ... victims"

ABUSE OF STUDENTS 2014

abuse of students has long history

 
ABUSE OF INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS
 
We must recognise racism in order to end it
8 Jan 2014
In the wake of the attack on Indian student Manrajwinder Singh, Australians need to reflect on the continuing scourge of racism and what they can do to end it, writes Chris Raja.
'Kill the beast! Cut his throat! Spill his blood!'
As I was researching the recent bashing of Manrajwinder Singh, a 20-year-old Indian student who has emerged from a coma after he was brutally bashed in the streets of Melbourne, I came across an internet forum titled "Indian students: How to not get bashed in Australia".
Here is a sample:
... best way to not get bashed as an Indian?
DON'T FUCKING COME HERE. You are not welcome. Whites, Asian and islanders all hate you. You come over on a student visa but after you enrol in some dodgy course, your out trying to scam a job. Hint - no one believes you have a Degree in anything.
it is Illegal to sleep 20 to a room and it stinks.
We actually look at bashing Indians as a sport. The majority of the bashings you see on TV are by African refugees or Pacific Islanders.
You have to accept your second class and thinking you have a sense of entitlement is going to get you a smack in the mouth.

Mr Singh is the latest in a long string of Indian students who have been attacked in Australia, and it seems to me that not much is being done about it. Mr Singh was allegedly beaten with a stick and punched in the face, and as a result was taken to the Alfred Hospital and put in an induced coma with serious injuries. This latest attack on an Indian student left me wondering about race relations in Australia.
Racism is not confined to one race - all communities need to join hands to end it. The sad reality is racism can be found in any group in Australia. No group is exempt. The culture of racism in Australia needs to be addressed without targeting one race or community. At a loss to know what to do, I have begun to reflect on my own experience.
My story in Australia is similar to that of so many others - arriving as an Indian migrant child with my family in the mid-1980s to a culture where having a go at people is a social pastime that does not spare anyone. Into this attractive new home I arrived, trying to make a life, trying to fit in, and more importantly, trying not to be different and avoid being the butt of insensitive jokes.
Within three years, between the ages of 12 to 15, I learnt to play Aussie Rules and I learned to talk with an Australian accent. Sure, I encountered racism. Name-calling was the start: Boong, Buddha, Wog, you speak funny. The food you eat smells different. I put up with it and assimilated quick smart, but I saw it take its toll on my parents: the new ways, the aggression, the occasional put down.
Gradually, I have seen Australia grow up, but I think it was partly this ambivalent attitude to race and racism amongst many Australians I met in my teenage years, as well as a sense of curiosity, that took me to the heart of Australia to live and work with the First Australians whose land we live on.
I moved to Alice Springs in 2004 when I was 28. I noticed the place was different. I noticed some people living in conditions similar to that I had seen in India. I saw people without jobs. I saw people with limps. I noticed clusters of people who did nothing. When I asked people why this was the case, it was explained to me: "These people have every chance in the world. Most choose to live the way they do."
As a writer, educator and researcher, I noticed that the levels of literacy in the Northern Territory was much lower than what I had seen in other parts of the country. For a while I worked at the Alice Springs Correction Centre teaching basic literacy and numeracy, and there I saw first hand a jail chock-a-block full of Aboriginal men. What shocked me more was the fact that many of these men could not read, write or count. They could not fill out basic government forms, nor did many know simple addition or subtraction. When I asked why, it was explained to me that they were not native English speakers. I met one man who was doing eight years in jail. When we rolled two dice, he could not add up four plus four - the same number of years he was serving.
"English is their third or fourth language, and an adherence to their old culture holds them back," was the common mantra I heard. It was suggested to me that it is best that "those people get over their culture and language and adapt".
For a while, I believed this to be a solution. After all, it was what I did.
Over time, I noticed other things that were not quite right ... the town camps, the attitudes of some of my friends, the instances of bashings, violence, deaths in custody, poverty, Basic Cards, royalty money, break-ins, stabbings, broken arms, black eyes, yelling, identity checks, the need for more police, drinking, boredom, car accidents, mining, rubbish, smashed glass, empty bottles, suicides, funerals, sadness, court room dramas. A gulf exists, but no one it seemed was acknowledging it. If you spoke up, you were labelled as a troublemaker, a do-gooder, or a whiner.
There were few occasions when society mixed. Mostly people live in segregated areas. If you think I'm exaggerating, try approaching a real estate agent as I did with my Indigenous male friend and ask to inspect houses for rent. In one example, on seeing the client, the real estate agent immediately claimed to not have keys to the house. In Alice Springs, boundaries are rarely crossed.
This place is a microcosm of Australia. It is polarised but gradually even I turned a blind eye to the segregation. After 10 years in Alice Springs, you stop seeing. You stop noticing that the big fish in the little pond syndrome is a dynamic that exists here, and one can become immune to how the rest of the world is seeing things, which can be markedly different.
Racism exists in Alice Springs as it does in the rest of Australia. This is seldom acknowledged and almost never so by those in public office. It is an issue ignored, downplayed and denied. It seems to me when bad things happen in Australia it simply gets "white washed" over.
Since this problem is not recognised, it cannot be solved. And in the absence of its recognition it grows in strength. This debate polarises people. That is not my intention. I hope to bring people together, get things out in the open, and acknowledge we might just have a problem, and that problem might be racism. Silence only drives the issue underground.
Essentially, we should aim to provide all Australians with simple things they can personally do to help end racism and discrimination by making an individual stand that collectively can effectively address the greater challenge.
Let's move forward. Let's end racism. A collective recognition that racism exists in Australia will not weaken us: it will strengthen us. And from this we will grow in stature.
Chris Raja is a writer based in Alice Springs. View his full profile here.

17 Jan 2014
 
Sydney Uni says third
party error to blame for
jumping the gun on first
round offers by 12 hours
  • Students told at 9am they've earned a place at Sydney University
  • Second text tells them to ignore the first text and check back at the official time
  • University blames third party
  • No guarantees for affected students